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Writing the heavenly frontier : metaphor, geography, and flight autobiography in America 1927-1954

Author: Denice H Turner
Publisher: Amsterdam ; New York : Rodopi, 2011.
Series: Costerus, new ser., v. 187.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Writing the Heavenly Frontier celebrates the early voices of the air as it examines the sky as a metaphorical and political landscape. While flight histories usually focus on the physical dangers of early aviation, this book introduces the figurative liabilities of ascension. Early pilot-writers not only grappled with an unwieldy machine, they also grappled with poetics that were extremely selective. Tropes that  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Biography
History
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Denice H Turner
ISBN: 9789042032972 9042032979 9789042032965 9042032960
OCLC Number: 711871033
Description: 1 online resource (x, 221 pages) : illustrations.
Contents: Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction Writing the Heavenly Frontier; I THE MUNDANE TO THE MIRACULOUS; II THE COLORS OF THE EARTH AND THE SANCTITY OF SPACE; III MASCULINE SPACES AND WOMEN FLYERS; IV AERIAL GEOGRAPHIES AND IMPERIAL DISCOURSES; Epilogue Late Century Metaphors: Larry Walters and the Rich Man's Wedding Cake; Index.
Series Title: Costerus, new ser., v. 187.
Responsibility: Denice Turner.

Abstract:

Writing the Heavenly Frontier celebrates the early voices of the air as it examines the sky as a metaphorical and political landscape. While flight histories usually focus on the physical dangers of early aviation, this book introduces the figurative liabilities of ascension. Early pilot-writers not only grappled with an unwieldy machine, they also grappled with poetics that were extremely selective. Tropes that cast Charles Lindbergh as the transcendent hero of the new millennium were the same ones that kept women, black Americans, and indigenous peoples imaginatively tethered to the ground.
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